Personal Inquiries

 

For the past several weeks the year 6 students have been engaged in personal inquiries in connection to our Where We Are in Place and Time unit about migration. They have chosen category of migration to explore (early migration, modern migration, refugee migration) and have developed questions to help gain understanding of our lines of inquiry and related concepts.

 

Some of the guiding questions that students have been using to explore their migration ‘lens’ have been:

What is early/modern/refugee migration?

What are the reasons people migrate?

What are the impacts of migration on the individual, relationships and/or communities?

What challenges, risks and opportunities are connected to that migration ‘lens’?

 

While exploring the resources on our Where We Are in Place and Time padlet students have been independently using thinking routines to frame their thinking and help them dig deeper. These thinking routines include:

 

See, Think, Wonder

Think,Puzzle, Explore

Connect, Extend, Challenge

 

After each research session students have  also reflected on what they achieved during that learning block and what ATLs (skills) they developed as a result.

We would like to encourage you to have a conversation with your child regarding the process they undertook when conducting a personal inquiries as they are a major learning engagement in preparation for our PYP Exhibition. Below are some questions to facilitate that discussion:

  • What did you find out regarding migration so far?

  • How are the related concepts of risk, challenge and opportunity connected to migration?

  • Can you show me how you use a thinking routine in class (see thinking routine names above)

  • What ATL do you think you developed the most during your personal inquiry? Why do you think that?

Math

For the past couple of weeks, the Year 6 students have been learning about data handling and how to collect, organize, represent and interpret data (CORI). We initiated our investigation on data handling by looking at various graphs connected to migration though some of the key concepts.

We looked closely at the graphs’ form (what is it like?), function (how does it work?); causation (why is it the way it is?) and change (how is it changing?). We also tried to figure out what questions might have been asked in order to collect the data that the graph was representing. We used a Venn diagram to then compare and contrast two/three different types of graphs (pie, bar, line).

After our initial investigation we set off to create our own graphs. We collected data about refugee migrant populations and organized it into a table. We then tried to represent this data by sketching it in our math journals. While doing this some of us noticed that because the range of our data was so wide the intervals on our graphs would be really large and some of our data would become irrelevant. To tackle this problem, we revisited some of the examples that we had already looked at early in the unit.  Some of us were able to come up with some creative solutions to represent the discrepancy in data but we are all still working towards consolidating our understanding in relationship between intervals and how we choose to collect our data.

We are currently learning how to transfer that data to a spreadsheet and use Google sheets to generate a graph. Our first attempt at this was quite successful as we figured out how to use the program. Our next steps will be to get feedback so that we can revise and edit our first draft. Once our graphs are complete we will spend some time drawing conclusions and interpreting the information that we have represented.

Please see here for the mathematical learning outcomes that were posted earlier during this unit.

 

Data handling

As part of our investigation into our Unit of Inquiry ‘Where We Are in Place and Time’ we will be analysing and interpreting a wide range of data. This week we unpacked a series of different graphs connected to migration, and students recorded their prior knowledge and new thinking during a ‘bus stop’ learning engagement. Students also thought carefully about the questions that might have been ask ed to gather the data to develop the graphs.

 

These investigations are aligned to the following Mathematics outcomes for data handling:

 

 

Phase 3: transferring meaning into symbols

 

•   identify, read and interpret range and scale on graphs
•   identify the mode in a set of data
Phase 3: applying with understanding •  design a survey and systematically collect, organise and display data in pictographs and bar graphs
•  select appropriate graph forms to display data
•   interpret range and scale on graphs
Phase 4: constructing meaning •  understand that different types of graphs have different purposes
•  understand that mode, median, mean and range can summarise a set of data
Phase 4: transferring meaning into symbols • collect, display and interpret data in pie charts and line graphs

Alts

 

As part of the Primary Years Programme, learners use and develop ‘Approaches to Learning’ (ATL) or skills to support their learning.

“In order to conduct purposeful inquiry and in order to be well prepared for lifelong learning, students need to master a whole range of skills beyond those normally referred to as basic. These include skills, relevant to all the subject areas and also transcending them, needed to support fully the complexities of the lives of the students.”   – Making the PYP Happen, page 21.

This week we unpacked the ATL by engaging in a sorting learning engagement. Students carefully read and categorized sets of skills, and justified their response. We identified strategies in order to categorize the skills and had thoughtful collaborative discussions as part of the process. We noted that many of the skills are connected, for example, aspects of communication skills are also part of developing positive social skills.

“Within their learning throughout the programme, students acquire and apply a set of transdisciplinary skills: social skills, communication skills, thinking skills, research skills and self-management skills. These skills are valuable, not only in the units but also for any teaching and learning that goes on within the classroom, and in life outside the school”.    –   Making the PYP Happen, page 21.  


Students will be developing a goal based on self-management skills or social skills in the week following the October break.

Please chat with your child about which skills they feel they are successfully applying and those they find challenging and want to focus on further.