Mathematics

 

In connection to the How we express ourselves unit, our focus for mathematics will be on ‘Shape & Space’. Our learning outcomes (see below) will tie quite nicely with the unit as concepts and understandings around shape and space can easily be connected to notions of beauty and the elements and principles of art & design.

As preparation for this we have been reviewing what we have learned about perimeter and area of 2D shapes. This week we have also started investigating volume of 3D shapes. In addition to consolidating the learning outcomes for measurement which started in our How the world works unit, we will be focussing on the following learning outcomes for shape & space:

Phase 3: Applying with understanding

  • Analyse and describe 2D and 3D shapes, including regular and irregular polygons, using geometric vocabulary
  • Identify, describe and model congruency and similarity in 2D shapes

Phase 4: Constructing meaning

  • Understand the common language to describe shapes
  • Understand the properties of circles
  • Understand the properties of regular and irregular polyhedra

Phase 4: Transferring meaning into symbols

  • Create and model how a 2D net converts to a 3D shape and vice versa
  • Analyse , describe, classify and visualize 2D and 3D shapes using geometric vocabulary

For a recap (cheat sheet) on vocabulary, definition and formulas regarding some of the mathematics learning that has been occurring in Year 6 please click here.

Collaborative planning meeting

As part of our belief in the importance of promoting student voice and ownership over their learning, we – the Year 6 teachers – invited representatives from each Year 6 section to participate in a collaborative meeting regarding our current unit of inquiry: How the World Works. Representatives interviewed their peers in respective classes and collected ideas and suggestions about the types of learning engagements they would like to be involved in to develop their understanding of the central idea. Some of their suggestions included guest speakers, fishbowl debates, and new opportunities for personal inquiries. We will be using these suggestions to guide and build learning tasks over the course of this unit. As the year progresses, we will continue to look for opportunities to encourage student independence and ownership.

HTWW- Provocation

This week Year 6 engaged in a number of different learning tasks designed to provoke thinking, wondering and curiosity. These learning experiences were instrumental in starting our new unit of inquiry under the transdisciplinary theme of How the world works.

 

Students applied and developed their self-management, thinking, social and communication skills as they divided allocated time to engage in two tasks in small groups across the Year 6 cohort. The tasks were structured around the related concepts for the unit: innovation, impact, technological advances. One task involved the use of a visual prompt in the form of a Venn Diagram. Students made observations, made connections, and created questions and wonderings about this visual. The other task involved students discussing and determining their position, from strongly agree to strongly disagree about a series of statements connected to the related concepts. These learning engagements promoted much meaningful discussion and questioning. This allowed teachers to identify prior knowledge including misconceptions. Such data will be used for the planning of new learning engagements.

 

On Thursday this week, Year 6 were given a task and set of written guidelines. The main task was to find the answer to a question connected to inventions without using any technology. They could use the whole campus and were very excited to be communicating with various staff members and students across the school. During the debriefing session, students identified challenges such as lack of resources, and use of time-management and communication skills. They identified many strong links with the Learner Profile and attitudes, including Independence, Commitment and Enthusiasm. They also noticed connections with the importance of the approaches to learning (skills). We will continue unpacking this key provocation next week.

Please chat with your child about the provocation learning engagements this week. You may wish to ask the following:

Which task prompted the most thinking for you?

How did you feel when you were given written instructions for the task on Thursday and why?

What did you enjoy the most about this week’s provocations and why?

FOLSCO Fundraising

Dear Parents,

 While we are fortunate enough to end the year with our loved ones, indulging in nice food, and exchanging gifts, there are children who never get a chance to experience any of this. Children who are parentless, homeless, and vulnerable living on the streets of Luanda.

 FOLSCO- Friends of Luanda’s Street Children, is a charity community with the aim to help vulnerable homeless children and orphans in Luanda. Their mission is to raise awareness about street children, connect shelters to companies for funds and financially support the existing shelters through collection of donations and fundraising events. If you would like to find more information about FOLSCO here is the website, http://folsco.org/ .

 Last year, LIS students from Yr1 and Yr2 helped FOLSCO to prepare 200 parcels to give out to the homeless street children during their End of the Year Party. We would like to repeat this charitable event this year but expand the fundraiser to include year 3-6 as well. Hopefully we will be able to reach out further and include Shelters and Orphanages who have opened their doors to these children.

 We are kindly asking parents and families to donate toothpastes, toothbrushes, soap bars, crayons (pack of 10), and drawing pads and bring them to school from Nov 27- Dec 8. If you are able to also bring plastic or paper ‘gift bags’ that would be very appreciated. Your child’s homeroom teacher will collect the items in the classroom.

 The students will be helping to make parcels with the above donated items during the week Dec 11-15. They will use their own initiatives to decorate the parcels and perhaps make cards as well.

 We appreciate your contributions and so will these well deserving children.

 Kind Regards,

 Primary Team

______________________________________________________

Caros Pais,

 Enquanto muitos têm a sorte de passar o fim do ano com aqueles de quem mais gostam, desfrutando de boa comida e trocando presentes, há crianças que nem sequer sabem o que isso significa. Crianças que crescem sem pais, sem casa, e vivem vulneráveis pelas ruas de Luanda.

 A comunidade FOLSCO (Amigos das Crianças de Rua de Luanda) tem como missão ajudar as crianças e órfãos que vivem desamparados nas ruas de Luanda. O objectivo da FOLSCO é sensibilizar o público para as condições destas crianças, colocar os abrigos e lares em contacto com empresas que possam contribuir e apoiar com fundos as instituições que já proporcionam alguma ajuda, promovendo recolhas de donativos e eventos de angariação de fundos. Para saber mais acerca da missão e objectivos da FOLSCO, por favor visite o site http://folsco.org/.

 O ano passado, os alunos da LIS dos Anos 1 e 2 ajudaram a FOLSCO a preparar 200 embrulhos para distribuir às crianças de rua durante a Festa de Fim de Ano. Este ano, gostaríamos de repetir esta iniciativa solidária, e ir ainda mais longe, incluindo também os alunos dos Anos 3 a 6. Esperamos assim conseguir chegar a mais Abrigos e Orfanatos que dependem da nossa ajuda para acolher estas crianças que tanto precisam.

 Por isso estamos a pedir aos pais e às famílias para fazer um donativo de escovas e pastas de dentes, sabonetes, lápis de cor (caixas de 10) e cadernos de desenho, e entregar estes artigos na escola a partir do dia 27 de Novembro até 8 de Dezembro. Se puderem também incluir um saco de papel ou plástico que sirva de embrulho, ficamos muito agradecidos. Os professores de homeroom ficarão encarregues de recolher todos os artigos doados nas suas respectivas salas.

 Durante a semana de 11 a 15 de Dezembro, os alunos da Primária terão oportunidade de ajudar a fazer os embrulhos com os artigos angariados, decorar os sacos como melhor entenderem e talvez incluir também um cartão com uma mensagem.

 Agradecemos desde já a vossa colaboração e apoio, e sabemos que as crianças também ficarão gratas.

 Com os melhores cumprimentos,

A Equipa da Primária

Personal Inquiries

 

For the past several weeks the year 6 students have been engaged in personal inquiries in connection to our Where We Are in Place and Time unit about migration. They have chosen category of migration to explore (early migration, modern migration, refugee migration) and have developed questions to help gain understanding of our lines of inquiry and related concepts.

 

Some of the guiding questions that students have been using to explore their migration ‘lens’ have been:

What is early/modern/refugee migration?

What are the reasons people migrate?

What are the impacts of migration on the individual, relationships and/or communities?

What challenges, risks and opportunities are connected to that migration ‘lens’?

 

While exploring the resources on our Where We Are in Place and Time padlet students have been independently using thinking routines to frame their thinking and help them dig deeper. These thinking routines include:

 

See, Think, Wonder

Think,Puzzle, Explore

Connect, Extend, Challenge

 

After each research session students have  also reflected on what they achieved during that learning block and what ATLs (skills) they developed as a result.

We would like to encourage you to have a conversation with your child regarding the process they undertook when conducting a personal inquiries as they are a major learning engagement in preparation for our PYP Exhibition. Below are some questions to facilitate that discussion:

  • What did you find out regarding migration so far?

  • How are the related concepts of risk, challenge and opportunity connected to migration?

  • Can you show me how you use a thinking routine in class (see thinking routine names above)

  • What ATL do you think you developed the most during your personal inquiry? Why do you think that?

Math

For the past couple of weeks, the Year 6 students have been learning about data handling and how to collect, organize, represent and interpret data (CORI). We initiated our investigation on data handling by looking at various graphs connected to migration though some of the key concepts.

We looked closely at the graphs’ form (what is it like?), function (how does it work?); causation (why is it the way it is?) and change (how is it changing?). We also tried to figure out what questions might have been asked in order to collect the data that the graph was representing. We used a Venn diagram to then compare and contrast two/three different types of graphs (pie, bar, line).

After our initial investigation we set off to create our own graphs. We collected data about refugee migrant populations and organized it into a table. We then tried to represent this data by sketching it in our math journals. While doing this some of us noticed that because the range of our data was so wide the intervals on our graphs would be really large and some of our data would become irrelevant. To tackle this problem, we revisited some of the examples that we had already looked at early in the unit.  Some of us were able to come up with some creative solutions to represent the discrepancy in data but we are all still working towards consolidating our understanding in relationship between intervals and how we choose to collect our data.

We are currently learning how to transfer that data to a spreadsheet and use Google sheets to generate a graph. Our first attempt at this was quite successful as we figured out how to use the program. Our next steps will be to get feedback so that we can revise and edit our first draft. Once our graphs are complete we will spend some time drawing conclusions and interpreting the information that we have represented.

Please see here for the mathematical learning outcomes that were posted earlier during this unit.

 

Data handling

As part of our investigation into our Unit of Inquiry ‘Where We Are in Place and Time’ we will be analysing and interpreting a wide range of data. This week we unpacked a series of different graphs connected to migration, and students recorded their prior knowledge and new thinking during a ‘bus stop’ learning engagement. Students also thought carefully about the questions that might have been ask ed to gather the data to develop the graphs.

 

These investigations are aligned to the following Mathematics outcomes for data handling:

 

 

Phase 3: transferring meaning into symbols

 

•   identify, read and interpret range and scale on graphs
•   identify the mode in a set of data
Phase 3: applying with understanding •  design a survey and systematically collect, organise and display data in pictographs and bar graphs
•  select appropriate graph forms to display data
•   interpret range and scale on graphs
Phase 4: constructing meaning •  understand that different types of graphs have different purposes
•  understand that mode, median, mean and range can summarise a set of data
Phase 4: transferring meaning into symbols • collect, display and interpret data in pie charts and line graphs

Alts

 

As part of the Primary Years Programme, learners use and develop ‘Approaches to Learning’ (ATL) or skills to support their learning.

“In order to conduct purposeful inquiry and in order to be well prepared for lifelong learning, students need to master a whole range of skills beyond those normally referred to as basic. These include skills, relevant to all the subject areas and also transcending them, needed to support fully the complexities of the lives of the students.”   – Making the PYP Happen, page 21.

This week we unpacked the ATL by engaging in a sorting learning engagement. Students carefully read and categorized sets of skills, and justified their response. We identified strategies in order to categorize the skills and had thoughtful collaborative discussions as part of the process. We noted that many of the skills are connected, for example, aspects of communication skills are also part of developing positive social skills.

“Within their learning throughout the programme, students acquire and apply a set of transdisciplinary skills: social skills, communication skills, thinking skills, research skills and self-management skills. These skills are valuable, not only in the units but also for any teaching and learning that goes on within the classroom, and in life outside the school”.    –   Making the PYP Happen, page 21.  


Students will be developing a goal based on self-management skills or social skills in the week following the October break.

Please chat with your child about which skills they feel they are successfully applying and those they find challenging and want to focus on further.

 

Camp

Last week our Year 6 students and team embarked on the Y6 camp. Students arrived at school on Thursday morning with a lot of enthusiasm and many, with very full bags! The focus of our camp was on the attitudes of independence, cooperation and enthusiasm, as well as building community through teamwork and collaboration.

Many teachers from different sections of the school led a range of activities that promoted the importance and benefits of working in a team. Activities included:

  • Development of Camp Essential Agreements
  • Tent set-up and dismantle
  • Cooperative games with Mr. Andy
  • Mindfulness activities with Ms. Michelle and Ms. Nicola
  • Team games with Ms. Nicky
  • Art activities with Ms. Hannah
  • Predator and Prey with Mr. Chiltern
  • Morning Yoga with Ms. Molly
  • Capture the Flag with Mr. Ali and Mr. Paul
  • Singing with Ms. Betsy
  • Pool team games with the PE Aquatics Department

Students also had sessions of unstructured time where they chose to engage in activities including reading, chatting, playing tag, playing frisbee, and participating in running races.  

Overall, the camp was a great success! We hope you enjoy the following photos of camp: